can you drink too much water??

Discussion in 'Lipotrim Forum' started by fat boy slim, 7 June 2008 Social URL.

  1. fat boy slim

    fat boy slim gaggin for a beer!

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    can too much be bad for you?
     
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  3. fattothin

    fattothin Gold Member

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    yes you can I will look for some info somewhere??
     
  4. missyd

    missyd Gold Member

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    cant you get water poisoning if you drink to much????? it flushes out to many toxins x
     
  5. fattothin

    fattothin Gold Member

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    Im still looking for what I read before but cant find it? However I did find this on the net its interesting and upto you how you relate to it as there is no difinitive answer to your original question, I shall keep searching, unless a mod can point you in the right direction:-
    Liquid H2O is the sine qua non of life. Making up about 66 percent of the human body, water runs through the blood, inhabits the cells, and lurks in the spaces between. At every moment water escapes the body through sweat, urination, defecation or exhaled breath, among other routes. Replacing these lost stores is essential but rehydration can be overdone. There is such a thing as a fatal water overdose.

    Earlier this year, a 28-year-old California woman died after competing in a radio station's on-air water-drinking contest. After downing some six liters of water in three hours in the "Hold Your Wee for a Wii" (Nintendo game console) contest, Jennifer Strange vomited, went home with a splitting headache, and died from so-called water intoxication.

    There are many other tragic examples of death by water. In 2005 a fraternity hazing at California State University, Chico, left a 21-year-old man dead after he was forced to drink excessive amounts of water between rounds of push-ups in a cold basement. Club-goers taking MDMA ("ecstasy") have died after consuming copious amounts of water trying to rehydrate following long nights of dancing and sweating. Going overboard in attempts to rehydrate is also common among endurance athletes. A 2005 study in the New England Journal of Medicine found that close to one sixth of marathon runners develop some degree of hyponatremia, or dilution of the blood caused by drinking too much water.

    Hyponatremia, a word cobbled together from Latin and Greek roots, translates as "insufficient salt in the blood." Quantitatively speaking, it means having a blood sodium concentration below 135 millimoles per liter, or approximately 0.4 ounces per gallon, the normal concentration lying somewhere between 135 and 145 millimoles per liter. Severe cases of hyponatremia can lead to water intoxication, an illness whose symptoms include headache, fatigue, nausea, vomiting, frequent urination and mental disorientation.

    In humans the kidneys control the amount of water, salts and other solutes leaving the body by sieving blood through their millions of twisted tubules. When a person drinks too much water in a short period of time, the kidneys cannot flush it out fast enough and the blood becomes waterlogged. Drawn to regions where the concentration of salt and other dissolved substances is higher, excess water leaves the blood and ultimately enters the cells, which swell like balloons to accommodate it.

    Most cells have room to stretch because they are embedded in flexible tissues such as fat and muscle, but this is not the case for neurons. Brain cells are tightly packaged inside a rigid boney cage, the skull, and they have to share this space with blood and cerebrospinal fluid, explains Wolfgang Liedtke, a clinical neuroscientist at Duke University Medical Center. "Inside the skull there is almost zero room to expand and swell," he says.

    Thus, brain edema, or swelling, can be disastrous. "Rapid and severe hyponatremia causes entry of water into brain cells leading to brain swelling, which manifests as seizures, coma, respiratory arrest, brain stem herniation and death," explains M. Amin Arnaout, chief of nephrology at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School.

    Where did people get the idea that guzzling enormous quantities of water is healthful? A few years ago Heinz Valtin, a kidney specialist from Dartmouth Medical School, decided to determine if the common advice to drink eight, eight-ounce glasses of water per day could hold up to scientific scrutiny. After scouring the peer-reviewed literature, Valtin concluded that no scientific studies support the "eight x eight" dictum (for healthy adults living in temperate climates and doing mild exercise). In fact, drinking this much or more "could be harmful, both in precipitating potentially dangerous hyponatremia and exposure to pollutants, and also in making many people feel guilty for not drinking enough," he wrote in his 2002 review for the American Journal of Physiology—Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology. And since he published his findings, Valtin says, "not a single scientific report published in a peer-reviewed publication has proven the contrary."

    Most cases of water poisoning do not result from simply drinking too much water, says Joseph Verbalis, chairman of medicine at Georgetown University Medical Center. It is usually a combination of excessive fluid intake and increased secretion of vasopression (also called antidiuretic hormone), he explains. Produced by the hypothalamus and secreted into the bloodstream by the posterior pituitary gland, vasopressin instructs the kidneys to conserve water. Its secretion increases in periods of physical
    stress—during a marathon, for example—and may cause the body to conserve water even if a person is drinking excessive quantities.

    Every hour, a healthy kidney at rest can excrete 800 to 1,000 milliliters, or 0.21 to 0.26 gallon, of water and therefore a person can drink water at a rate of 800 to 1,000 milliliters per hour without experiencing a net gain in water, Verbalis explains. If that same person is running a marathon, however, the stress of the situation will increase vasopressin levels, reducing the kidney's excretion capacity to as low as 100 milliliters per hour. Drinking 800 to 1,000 milliliters of water per hour under these conditions can potentially lead a net gain in water, even with considerable sweating, he says.

    While exercising, "you should balance what you're drinking with what you're sweating," and that includes sports drinks, which can also cause hyponatremia when consumed in excess, Verbalis advises. "If you're sweating 500 milliliters per hour, that is what you should be drinking."

    But measuring sweat output is not easy. How can a marathon runner, or any person, determine how much water to consume? As long as you are healthy and equipped with a thirst barometer unimpaired by old age or mind-altering drugs, follow Verbalis's advice, "drink to your thirst. It's the best indicator."
     
  6. howdy-doody

    howdy-doody Eloquent hooligan

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  7. nictastic

    nictastic Says it as it is!!!

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    LT reccommend Minimum of 4 pints and a maximum of 10 pints a day! ( not including the water in your shakes...this is in addition)
     
  8. Bindi

    Bindi Silver Member

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    Hmmm what does 10 pints equate to in litres (Im drinking 4-5 litres per day)
     
  9. nictastic

    nictastic Says it as it is!!!

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    10 pints = 5.68261 Ltrs
    but if you exercise you get rid of some and the bigger you are the more you need as per icemooses info x
     
  10. fattothin

    fattothin Gold Member

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    roughly 5 litres
     
  11. fattothin

    fattothin Gold Member

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    not bad guess hey x
     
  12. Bindi

    Bindi Silver Member

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    thats gas, never knew you could drink too much H2O
     
  13. fattothin

    fattothin Gold Member

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    what does gas mean I keep seeing you Irish using it all the time ???? x
     
  14. RebelGal

    RebelGal Member

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    Gas sorta means funny!
     
  15. KathyM1206

    KathyM1206 New Member

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    Hi

    YOUR WEIGHT LOSE IS A INSPIRATION, I STARTED LIPOTRIM FOR WHILE STARTED AT 19ST 6LB..NOW 14ST 12LB

    WELL DONE TO YOU, ;)
     
  16. Jinnie

    Jinnie Full Member

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    Had my mother on the phone to me today, telling me to cut down the water intake!! She had read about someone dying from drinking too much water.

    Are we at risk? I drink about 7 pints daily at the moment (after an initial blip!!)

    cheers peeps
     
  17. rainbow brite

    rainbow brite ~Starsprinkled~

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    Don't drink more than 6 litres per day and you should be fine. It's a good idea to aim for about 4/5 litres
     
  18. eyesdontlie

    eyesdontlie Full Member

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    you can die from water poisoning there is a thread on here about it somewhere?

    6 litres I think is the max you should drink but I could be wrong
     
  19. Jinnie

    Jinnie Full Member

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    cheers girls and rainbrow brite, I love your cold in ketosis land pic, its awesome and so bloody true!!!! :)
     
  20. rainbow brite

    rainbow brite ~Starsprinkled~

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    Thank you honey :) I made it last night and it's free for anyone to use if they want. :)
     
  21. Jinnie

    Jinnie Full Member

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    Awww cheers, I'm going to get it now :) :) Thank you :)
     
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