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NHS Gastic Band Ops in the news today

#1
Did anyone else see this item on BBC breakfast this morning?

I can't believe the woman they interviewed made a 'spur of the moment decision' to have a gastric band!

I was also really peed off that she said she'd lost 3.5 stone on SW but put it all back on as her body had gone into starvation mode so when she started eating 'properly' again her body held onto the calories.

Sorry, but surely following SW means you ARE eating properly? I've been a member since May and have lost 1 stone 11.5 lb and not once have I felt I'm not eating properly.

Rant over!
 
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#2
I didn't see the item, but the idea of being on an eating plan like SW or WW is that they are meant to be a permanent lifestyle change - it's not a case of going back to your old eating habits once you've reached target. The point of such 'diets' is that they change your old eating habits for ones that are healthy and will help you lose weight, but ones that you can keep to and maintain your weight loss.
 
#3
I hope not to offend anyone who's chosen to go down the gastric band/operation route to losing weight as the vast majority take it very seriously and it's their only chance. Sounds like she was just lazy and didn't want to put in the work that a lifestyle change like SW or WW requires and the NHS frequently picks up the bill for them getting so big. Disgusting.
 
#4
I didn't see the item, but the idea of being on an eating plan like SW or WW is that they are meant to be a permanent lifestyle change - it's not a case of going back to your old eating habits once you've reached target. The point of such 'diets' is that they change your old eating habits for ones that are healthy and will help you lose weight, but ones that you can keep to and maintain your weight loss.
Well said. There's no way that if you're following the SW plan properly your body goes into 'starvation mode'. The plan is very generous on the amount of food you can eat. But it's simple logic that if you go back to your old eating habits you're going to pile the weight back on.
 
#5
This is the article from the BBC website:

Delia Stearnes was 19-and-a-half stone (124kg) when she paid to have her own gastric band fitted in January in a "spur of the moment" decision.
The 58-year-old told BBC Radio 4's Today programme shifting weight is not just as simple as eating less and healthier.
"I had lost three-and-a-half stone with Slimming World before, so I'd had a head start, but the thing is with weight loss, you can lose the weight but you just put it back on again eventually," she said.
"When you start dieting, your body thinks starvation mode, and shuts everything down and then when you start eating again - even if you're not binge-eating - it puts the weight back on.
"I personally probably don't need many calories at all to maintain my weight, whereas some people need a lot of calories to maintain their weight.
"I think there's more to it. I've had guilt heaped on me all my life really, so I think people are beginning to realise there may be a bit more to it."
 
#7
Surely with a gastric band, if you lose weight you can still put it back on eventually ?!

Oh well, it was her own choice and her own money (not NHS) so let's hope it works for her... I don't think she was referring directly to SW when she spoke about starvation mode, I think she's just not terribly eloquent ;)
 

RubyMoss

Silver Member
#8
It's a shame that this person either didn't have the motivation to stick at SW. Either that, or they simply didn't understand it properly, as SW most certainly cannot be considered as 'starvation mode'. It's a shame.

I know some people think that Gastric Bands are the 'easy ' option, which for some people is the truth (some people simply cannot be bothered with the hard work that a lifestyle change requires) but it's important to remember that for some people it's often the only option. I fully respect these people. It's a shame that someone describes their decision to get one as 'spur of the moment' - it's a serious thing and should take careful consideration.
 
#11
Someone I know had a gastric band fitted 18months ago, she lost 10 stone getting down to 14stone. In the last 6 months she has piled it all back on again. She scoffs so much that the band has just stretched, she has breakfast at Mcdonalds most days. What a waste of money, it cost her £7500 borrowed against the house.
 
#12
Someone I know had a gastric band fitted 18months ago, she lost 10 stone getting down to 14stone. In the last 6 months she has piled it all back on again. She scoffs so much that the band has just stretched, she has breakfast at Mcdonalds most days. What a waste of money, it cost her £7500 borrowed against the house.
Noooo!! Are you joking?? Breakfast at Mcdonalds???
Just shows. You need to educate people about WHAT to eat (maybe even how to cook??) as well as helping them with their willpower.
 
#15
I think education is the key here!! There's no point doing anything about your weight, whether it be diets or surgery, and not learning anything and ending up going back to eating 'normally' and putting it all back on. Waste of time, money, and effort! Of course there will always be people who want the quick fix, and who doesn't at times, but there really does need to be a LOT more education into healthy eating and living.x
 
#17
I'm having trouble getting the link to SW's answer to work :(
Copied and pasted below!

Why does the NHS ignore the risks of obesity surgery?

New figures showing a nine fold increase in the number of people having weight loss surgery over the last five years have been labelled “an unnecessary expense for the NHS and a danger to lives of individuals”.
The criticism by Slimming World comes after figures from the NHS Information Centre revealed that the number of patients having gastric surgery increased from 480 procedures in 2003-04 to 4,246 procedures in 2008-09.
According to the British Medical Journal (BMJ), between one in 300 and three in 300 people die as a result of having weight loss surgery – a figure that Slimming World says is “horrifying and unacceptable”.
Jacquie Lavin, Slimming World head of nutrition and research says: “What if a slimming club with 300,000 members like us, was to declare that, while the potential long term health benefits of joining are enormous, around one in 300 of its members will die from doing so? Or that one in 20 is at risk of serious complications such as infection or gut perforations. It’s horrifying and there would quite rightly be enormous public outcry. People need to be made aware that surgery is not a quick fix and, in fact, that it can be potentially life threatening.”
Funded by the taxpayer, weight loss surgery costs the NHS £4,000-£8,000 per patient for a gastric band or £8,000-£15,000 per patient for a gastric bypass. Yet a 12-week course at Slimming World costs just £55.68, and research published in the journal of Public Health showed that, on average, patients lose 6.4% of their body weight when attending 10 out of 12 weeks, and over half go on to self fund afterwards. This initial outlay sets patients on the right path to achieving long term lifestyle change.
“Suggestions that increased access to obesity surgery is the best way to save money and NHS funding are very wide of the mark because, as well as being expensive, surgery does little to tackle the root cause of obesity,” continues Jacquie. “Surgery takes no real account of an overweight person’s state of mind, their motivation, their self-esteem or their confidence to make long-term changes. It also does little to equip them with the support, motivation, information and practical skills they and their family need to move forward after treatment, as they battle to change from their old eating habits, unhealthy lifestyles and inactive routines.

“For many overweight people, failure to keep to the many diets out there based around hunger and restriction has sent them into a cycle of failure and plunging self-esteem. Suggestions that surgery is the only solution to the problem can only serve to heighten these feelings of failure and lack of control, putting the solution well and truly in someone else’s hands and leaving the individual bereft of the very support they needed in the first place.

“At Slimming World, with 40 years experience of working with overweight and obese people, we have learnt that the key to long term weight management is a healthy, generous and realistic plan that allows those who struggle with their weight to eat to satisfy their appetite with healthier foods. Combined with effective ongoing group support it provides a real long term solution for individuals, healthy habits that they can then pass on to future generations. What overweight people really need is compassionate support, without humiliation or guilt, that equips them to make lifestyle changes that are sustainable in the long term and that they can return to as many times as they need to for success. This is a long term healthy lifestyle change. There is no risk, the cost to the NHS or the individual is minimal and, unlike surgery, it empowers the individual and gives them the strength to take control of their lives and to make changes that will last a lifetime.”
-ends-
 
#18
if im honest and some 1 said to me here have 1 i'd prob take it! but i agree if u find a plan that works, SW did 4 me and stick to it it will work again!! i know where all the poundage came from......the kitchen!!! i've got excuses till they come out of my ears but when all is said and done unless u have a serious medical problem the fat on you arse comes from the crap u shove in your mouth (sorry for the language)! being a bigger person is like an illness and educating ur self and eating habits etc is you treatment. if u had kidney or liver disease the nhs wouldn't give u a transplant if u where an alcoholic......i don't see the difference really!! i know 2 people who have had them fitted and both regret it as the weight lost was so quick and they did not exercise their bodies did not adjust to their shrinking an now they have so much excess skin they are having tummy tuck boob lifts etc again all paid for by the nhs! i really think this should be a last last last resort! sorry if i sound a cow but we all trying so hard to change what we've done for years and improve r health/looks etc this just feels like a slap in the face :(
 

rosinakathleen

Big, busty and Blowsy!
#19
As someone's already said, unless you have an illness that makes you put on weight it's all down to bad eating.
I did mention to my Dh about the bands and he said it would be cheaper to just gag me! (His black eye took about a week to disappear completely!)
 


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