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non-alcoholic wedding

#1
Hi I've just found out that a wedding that Ive been invited to is actually a 'dry' wedding. Which I have never actually heard of, there isn't any religious reason as to why it won't be served its just the preference of the bride and groom I guess. But I'm still really surprised.
Hmmm I must admit that I'm really not looking forward to this sigh.
We also won't be getting dinner until 5, and there won't be a disco, just a band. Hmmmm

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kingleds

Gold Member
#2
No other way to go that class a's in that case!!!:)
If everyone is sober then the band thing might be a bit dull, but as someone who is often the most sober at social events i don't think i'd mind this at all. Of course i would be on my own as OH would refuse to go!

Maybe you could have a couple beforehand?
 
#3
One of my sisters had a wedding like that, and halfway through the afternoon we wondered where all the men had gone. Down the pub, of course!
 
#4
Could you slip a bottle of something in your handbag to go with your diet coke. I know it's not what the bridge & groom want, but what they don't know won't hurt them:rolleyes:

Otherwise I'd have a drink beforehand, I sound like an alki but I do often go out & drive so I don't have a drink & I don't mind.

I bet it's quite good having a band.
 
#5
Yeah I might try taking a bottle with me lol. I'm really shy when it comes to speaking to people I don't really know so having a few drinks really sorta loosens me up.
I don't intend to get smashed just a bit more relaxed.
The band is a steel band as well so again I'm not sure about the dancing neway..... hmm
The majority of the family don't drink and they wouldnt be bothered about speaking to people or dancing.

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kingleds

Gold Member
#6
A steel band is wicked!!! You will be tapping your feet booze or not. We had one at our wedding in Jamaica , plus a soul band at our reception at home.
 

Funky_Munky

Put the kettle on
#7
Hi I've just found out that a wedding that Ive been invited to is actually a 'dry' wedding. Which I have never actually heard of, there isn't any religious reason as to why it won't be served its just the preference of the bride and groom I guess. But I'm still really surprised.
Hmmm I must admit that I'm really not looking forward to this sigh.
We also won't be getting dinner until 5, and there won't be a disco, just a band. Hmmmm

Sent from my ZTE-BLADE using MiniMins
You dont need a drink to have a good time!! Weddings are brilliant and more than just a p**s up!!
 

Maximus

Gold Member
#8
Hi I've just found out that a wedding that Ive been invited to is actually a 'dry' wedding. Which I have never actually heard of, there isn't any religious reason as to why it won't be served its just the preference of the bride and groom I guess. But I'm still really surprised.
Hmmm I must admit that I'm really not looking forward to this sigh.
We also won't be getting dinner until 5, and there won't be a disco, just a band. Hmmmm

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Sounds really cool to me!

The average cliché ridden wedding involves too much booze, people pigging out then a load of blaring music where nobody can hear anyone else. Sounds great to me.

I know, I know, I'm getting old:eek:
 

biggysmalls

Too big to fail
#9
Personally I don't really understand dry weddings. Two things- 1. I find it a bit controlling of the bride and groom although yes, it's THEIR day etc etc. 2. In my experience many, many guests will try to drink somehow anyway. In toilets, in hotel room, hipflasks etc.
 

jaylou

Gold Member
#10
My first thought was that maybe one of the bride/groom/immediate family was a recovering alcoholic and didn't want any temptation?

Secondly, as a non drinker it wouldn't bother me one bit!

I've actually not heard of a dry wedding, however, I do recall spending a fortune on wine/fizz for my first wedding - people seemed to expect wine on the tables with the meal.

All I can say is that they must have their reasons and the choices are - don't go, take a bottle in your bag, or just don't drink. The latter is good for the waistline and the body :)
 
#11
maybe they or someone in their family is a recovering alcoholic, I'd quite like an evening where people aren't talking nonsense half way through because they've had too many.
 
#12
No no ones a recovering alcoholic or nething they just don't drink. Although I'm a little worried, its not a massive problem I can just see it being a little boring and possibly disappointing for the bride and groom as there won't be that celebratory atmosphere if you know what I mean. I also think its a little controlling .
I got married last oct and I think there would have been a riot i if I'd have tried to bann alcohol lol

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#13
I have to admit that I am really confused by all this. I can't see what the problem is. You can have fun, celebrations, a laugh, without alcohol.

And if I was going to an occasion where I knew that the people had issued the invitation had specified that there would be no alcohol - for whatever reason - I wouldn't dream of taking some along anyway. It would be so disrespectful.
 

jen3

Silver Member
#14
Well I think its a bit controlling - like when people tell guests what colour to wear! I would go but wouldnt bother sneaking drink in, would just nick off early if it was boring (not saying it would be boring because no-ones drinking but a little drinkie often breaks the ice at weddings)
 
#15
I agree its very controlling - and I'm not really sure why anyone would want to ban booze at their wedding, but (despite my inital flippant post) I also agree its a bit disrepectful to sneak in booze if they have made their wishes clear.

I do however think its an incorrect assumption that if there is booze there will be trouble. I have been to plenty of weddings where booze was flowing freely, and there was no trouble at all.

Difficult one. I would never dream of dictating to my friends what they could wear, do, drink at my wedding - but then I tend to have a live & let live policy on most things. A wedding is supposed to be about people celebrating, and whatever you think about it, part of the british phyche says that when you celebrate, you have a glass or two of something alchoholic.

I'm sure the band will be fun, and if it is boring, you don't have to stay to the death.
 

biggysmalls

Too big to fail
#16
I'm going to be 100% honest here.....If I was invited to another dry wedding, I personally would try to find an excuse not to go.
I like a drink, I can have fun without a drink too. But I think weddings are a special occasion, a time to let the hair down a bit and for many people in society, this involves having a drink. If I choose not to drink, fine. I might not feel like it / be pregnant / be a recovering alcoholic / be a teetotaller etc. But none of the guests being allowed to drink is controlling and I know I would feel like a hostage rather than a guest. I know others might find that reaction a bit extreme but I have been to one such event and I just really resented the bridezilla's control. I couldn't wait to leave!
Thankfully I can't think of a single close friend would invite me to such a wedding in future so it's a moot point, I suppose.
 
#17
I don't think it's any more 'controlling' than them choosing the menu options, or the venue or anything else they've decided about an event they're choosing to host. People are *invited* as guests and quite welcome not to go if having alcohol is that important to them.
 
#18
I know I am old and massively out of touch, but I sometimes think that weddings have got completely out of hand, and so expensive!

When I got married, the reception was in the church hall, there was a buffet (of the sandwiches and sausage roll kind), a glass of sherry on arrival, a glass of something fizzy for the toast and cutting the cake, then we left to go on honeymoon and everyone went home. No evening event, no dancing, no disco - no-one had those things then). It was great!

Which makes me sound very boring, I know, and I don't mean that people shouldn't have the wedding that they want. But it all seems so competitive somehow.

The other thing is - if you can't be "controlling" at your own wedding, when can you!
 
#19
I know I am old and massively out of touch, but I sometimes think that weddings have got completely out of hand, and so expensive!

The other thing is - if you can't be "controlling" at your own wedding, when can you!
I don't think you sound out of touch!
I think most people are looking to cut costs on a wedding nowadays anyway.
We delibrately got married abroad to avoid all the hassle & expense - it was about a quarter of the price to do it here - we spent 10 minutes organising everything when we got there, and when we got back we had a party in the local social club. We got the tablecloths from a pound shop and had palm tree centre pieces made of foil. It was brilliant!!!!!
 

charlies_mummy

all for my little man x
#20
We are considering having a dry wedding with the exception of one glass of champaigne each for the toasts. My future father in law does not know when to stop when he starts, and when his daughter got married a couple of years ago there was a huge punch up because of it. Since then have been so worried about our wedding that have considered eloping but my mum would be devestated. Although it might seem harsh to stop everyone drinking because of the concerns about one person I really don't care, it will be mine and my other halfs special day and if I found out that someone had disregarded my requests and either drank before hand or snuck some in I would be extremely hurt.
It's their day and if you feel you could not enjoy it without drinking then probably best you send your apologies.
Don't mean to sound harsh, so sorry if I do, but I just think that people's wishes should be respected. x
 


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