The cost of shopping!!!

Discussion in 'Slimming World Off Topic' started by meljh1989, 23 August 2014.

  1. meljh1989

    meljh1989 Member

    I have just got back from tesco and I'm gob smacked at just how expensive healthy food really is. The country has a weight problem and they wonder why. My shop before I started the diet was 15 pounds a week. This weeks shop has just cost me 56 pounds. This is worrying and shocking

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  2. Happy Holidays

    Happy Holidays Well-Known Member

    subscribe to the thread on here title something like 'where the bargains are'. I shop at Aldi & Lidl which are surprisingly cheap, I buy frozen fruit which is good in breakfast & added to yogurt tastes ok.

    If you search on here you'll find ideas for keeping the food bill cheaper.
  3. meljh1989

    meljh1989 Member

    Yeah I would normally do aldi as well but I just think it's bad that people have to shop about to be able to afford to be healthy. Surely it should be the other way round?

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  4. Nanny Doreen

    Nanny Doreen Well-Known Member

    It is the fruit I find most expensive.
  5. sareypoop

    sareypoop Well-Known Member

    I've massively cut down on the amount of fruit I buy purely because of the cost. I buy 2 melons, 2 punnets of grapes and a bunch of bananas for the week. Comes to just over a fiver from aldi x
  6. You used to feed yourself for a week for £15?
  7. *Emsie*

    *Emsie* Well-Known Member

    I find it ridiculous the amount I spend on food. ...currently more than my mortgage :eek:
  8. Nanny Doreen

    Nanny Doreen Well-Known Member

    Me too. Spent another £20 today and cupboard and freezer already full.
  9. I am economising at the moment so I have stopped buying fruit for the moment. Nothing in SW rules says you have to eat fruit - vegetables are just as good and a lot cheaper.
  10. Happy Holidays

    Happy Holidays Well-Known Member

    I've just been to Lidl & spent about £7 on fruit for me & OH this will see us until the end of the week, which isn't so bad I don't think. I bought cheap fruit & stuff which was on offer.

    As you say there aren't any SW rules which say you have to eat fruit but I do like it and I'm picky about what I buy I won't buy blueberries/blackberries/raspberries etc which are far too expensive.
  11. meljh1989

    meljh1989 Member

    I very much am a carb girl so I would buy cheap pasta and the cheep noddles and stuff like that before. I just think supermarkets and the government should focus on making healthy food more avaliable and cost effect. It should be cheaper to be healthy I think :)

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  12. Oh, I like fruit too, and normally buy it. But I have had a couple of unexpected expenses just recently and my pension was in danger of running out before the end of the month, so I had to cut back.

    Which was why I was fascinated by someone's shopping bill being £15 a week. That's less than £2.50 a day!
  13. Llamasoks

    Llamasoks Well-Known Member

    I'm always incredibly confused by groceries and differing costs. Me and my OH spend £120 a month (about £30 a week) on grocery shopping - maybe £20 more if it's a long month. I always thought that was expensive, we do an Ocado shop at the start of the month, bulk buy fruit (there's a lot of BOGOF's at the moment) and freeze some if there's too much (I've got more nectarines than I can eat at the moment) and do the in between bits at the local Waitrose or Green Grocer.

    I know obviously some shops are more expensive, but if you plan carefully it's entirely possible to be frugal. Meal plans are your best fried with healthy eating, we do a week where we use most of the same ingredients, Saturday is normally a pasta dish with leftovers (chucked in with a cheap bulk brought box of passata - Lidl 19p) and Sunday is a soup if there's anything left.

    It might not be possible for everyone, but in the long run, bulk buying saves you money.

    I always thought we were extravagant!
  14. Starlight93

    Starlight93 Well-Known Member

    Recently moved house and live in a small town with just a morrisons and tesco in and I don't drive. Used to find that lidl and aldi were much cheaper. Am definitely noticing a rise in my food bill :/ Thinking it will be good to plan ahead for the week then I won't end up buying food to waste, and will only buy what I need. As I am the only one in my family doing slimming world and a vegetarian (so can't cook it for everyone - they won't eat a meal unless it contains meat :/ ) it makes it so much more expensive.
  15. The cost of food is, broadly speaking, related to two things - quality and production.

    Fatty foods are cheap because fat is cheap. Processed foods are cheap because they have cheap ingredients - cheaper processed meats and sausages are made from parts of meat which no-one would eat if they saw them before they are processed. Lean protein is expensive because it is expensive to produce - the animals have to be fed differently, and this is more expensive. Farming, if done conscientiously, is expensive.

    Then there is the cost of getting the food to the consumer. Fruit, for example, is mostly hand-picked, mainly by people who aren't very well paid anyway. Hand-picking is time - and therefore money - consuming. We could have cheaper fruit if the pickers/graders weren't paid the minimum wage, but that's certainly not what I want to happen (although we know that it does happen, and there are many cases of seasonal agricultural workers being exploited in this way).

    Many vegetables are more robust than fruit, and can be machine-harvested, which makes them cheaper.

    Nor do I want to see milk sold at ridiculously cheap prices when I know that this is done at the expense of the dairy farmer who is being paid less for the milk than it is costing him to produce. And there is nothing he can do about it because if he doesn't accept the prices the supermarkets are offereing there is no-one else to sell to.

    Supermarkets are interested in selling things. That's it. Cheap deals, bargains, etc., are not for your benefit - they are there to get you into the shop to sell you more things. Any concern they appear to show for our health and wellbeing either forced on them by legislation, or is window-dressing.

    Governments are concerned with healthy eating because unhealthy eating means increased health-care costs. But in a free-market economy, they can't force shops to lower prices.
  16. janetelizabeth

    janetelizabeth Well-Known Member

    I've tried to get fresh fruit at Aldi but mostly don't like the quality. Some of the veggies are alright but compared to other supermarkets they aren't always cheaper when they're on offer.
    Lidl however, I think are much better and I get a lot there. Only issue for me is that neither store accept credit cards and later on in the month I need to use mine to get to the end of the month, so then I mostly shop at Morrisons. I'm careful with the 3 for £2 offer. Today I wanted tomatoes & lettuce but not a 3rd item so I paid 99p each. These items are usually £1.50 for a box of tomatoes and £1.25 for pkt 2 Romero lettuces.
    As has been said, it's best to buy seasonal foods because they will always be fresher. Many of the soft fruits from eg. Spain were picked back in May- can be passed their best. (I lived there for 14yrs)
    Thankfully I have the time and transport to shop around...
    Last edited: 28 August 2014
  17. Peachdream

    Peachdream Active Member

    I am currently finding it so expensive with all the fresh fruit (not a big fan of veg) But then I think of the money I used to waste on takeaways 2 nights a week and on chocolate bars and crisps and then it doesn't seem so bad :)
  18. GrannieAnnie

    GrannieAnnie Well-Known Member

    Much as I love my fruit, there`s a part of me that can`t wait to start making soups again!

    Usually speed soup as I`m no great cook. Want to get a soup maker next month when I come back from hols!!
  19. janetelizabeth

    janetelizabeth Well-Known Member

    Yes, I think I shall be thinking about making some soups soon too. My fave is carrot, butternut squash & coriander. I cook it in a large frypan and then liquidise it and dilute it down to required thickness.
  20. PatchworkPuss

    PatchworkPuss Well-Known Member

    You know I don't really think that it is to be honest. From what i've seen it's often people's eating, shopping and cooking habits that make it expensive rather than healthy eating in itself. I save a packet because I don't eat out at lunchtime, don;t have that latte and danish pastry on the way to work, don't have that £20 pizza at the weekend or the chocolate and popcorn at the cinema. I honestly think it can be done as inexpensively as you need it to but it does take a bit of planning and effort

    You can still buy those things now :)

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