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Work - honeymoon period over??

Devon Dolce

1lb at a time!
#1
Now before I start this post, please understand that I know in this current climate, that I'm lucky to have a job, and there are plenty of people who aren't as fortunate, but I really think the honeymoon is over at work and I think I may have been lulled into a false sense of security.

The work load (I've only been there 12 weeks) is ridiculous and more just seems to be coming. I really can't leave this job (again, I've only been here 12 weeks - how would that look on my CV??!) and I guess I just need to vent! My boss is just as busy and they told me when I started the role was a challenge, but this just seems as though it's a challenge that can never be completed and I feel as though I'm failing at absolutely everything I do. It's not helping at home either as I'm working late, going in early and have emails redirected to my phone just so I can keep on top of it all! I've never been someone who can leave work at the door and as a perfectionist I'm struggling with the company attitude of 'do and ask questions after'! Any advice on how to deal with it all, would be most appreciated xxx
 
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cherry-pie

Trying again in 2012
#2
I'm not sure I'm the best person to advise as right now I'm in the 12 hour day trap too but mine has an end in sight, a long 14 week end but an end nonetheless!!

Back to you and if you were a member of my staff I would help you by identifying priorities as it sounds as though you can't do it all at once! If you can, make a list of all the things you have on (just writing them down and getting them out of your head can help!) and then take the list to your Team Leader / Manager and say quite honestly that its all a little ovewhelming and you need some advice on what is urgent, what can wait, what can be delegated etc.

Please ask for some help - if you keep quiet they'll just think that you're ok with it. Don't be afraid to leave on time, or feel guilty about it, you don't have to work to rule but you don't want to be mugged off either!

Take care and let us know how you get on xxx

(BTW, you're entitled to moan and you are allowed to take a look what else is out there xxx)
 

Maximus

Gold Member
#3
You simply HAVE to separate work from home. We've all been there, sometimes to the detriment of friends, family - even partners:(

First off, the phone is NOT an extention of work and no work-related mails should be getting anywhere near it.

You simply have to stop this now or it will take over your life and ruin it!

Lay down some ground rules, draw up clear borders between employer and "you" time and if necessary, get the hell out of there.

What is more important? - an embarrassing entry on a CV, or a potential lifetime of misery.

Not saying it is easy, in the current climate, it depends on your job/trade/qualifications etc. but don't just accept your lot.

Steve
 

Devon Dolce

1lb at a time!
#5
^^ Marketing/PR/Communications xx
 
#6
Hi hun - honestly, leaving after 12 weeks cos its not the right job for you looks far better than cracking up due to the pressure. No job is worth getting yourself in a state over. Been there, done that, got the tshirt & the conselling to prove it.

Maximus is so right in everything he says. My counsellor asked me if i was being paid to do 2 jobs? When i said no she asked me why i was doing 2 jobs? I remember thinking at the time - she's blo"dy right! What a complete idiot i am!
 
#7
Ok, with my HR hat on, the advice that cherrypie has given you is spot on. Act now rather than delay and your manager needs to help you.

Answer really depends on what response you get when you raise it. Perhaps do it as a business case sort of model to try and keep it from feeling too personal and that you are 'failing' - it could be all sorts of things that are nothing to do with you, e.g. job design

Maximus is also spot on - if you are a valuable commodity, future employers aren't going to be phased by a job on your cv that turned out to be a turkey - the trend these days is for much shorter periods with one employer than it used to be (the old 'job for life' concept is well and truly dead in most cases).

In terms of purely practical resources have a look at a book called Getting Things Done by David Allen - you might find it helpful and it is quite cheap. He has a website and there are loads of resources about his simple system on the internet. A lot of different types of people I've recommended it to have found it useful - some in terms of being able to evidence their overwork!

Please don't get yourself to the stage where you get ill over this.

Oh yes and one final thing... as a fellow perfectionist - you have to be happy with turning in work that's 'good enough' in times of extreme workload else you will go bonkers! Have you got a friend or ex-colleague that you could ask to help you identify what's 'good enough' in your context?

Wishing you all the very best :cross:
 

Devon Dolce

1lb at a time!
#8
Thank you all for your wonderful, helpful replies. I will keep you posted on the work situation - there's nothing worse than taking the time to offer advice etc. and then not find out the outcome! xxx
 
#9
I started a job and after a few weeks realised I'd made a mistake. I sat down with my boss & explained how I felt; we both agreed to make changes. However, things didn't improve, so after 3 months I left with no job to go to. When I went for job interviews I was open and told them I'd made a mistake & told them why. I also thought it was best to leave after only a few months than leaving say after 12 months, for me the shorter employment period was easier to explain on a CV.

My honesty paid off and after 2 weeks I was back working in the same industry doing the same job;)
 
#10
Ok, with my HR hat on, the advice that cherrypie has given you is spot on. Act now rather than delay and your manager needs to help you.

Answer really depends on what response you get when you raise it. Perhaps do it as a business case sort of model to try and keep it from feeling too personal and that you are 'failing' - it could be all sorts of things that are nothing to do with you, e.g. job design

Maximus is also spot on - if you are a valuable commodity, future employers aren't going to be phased by a job on your cv that turned out to be a turkey - the trend these days is for much shorter periods with one employer than it used to be (the old 'job for life' concept is well and truly dead in most cases).

In terms of purely practical resources have a look at a book called Getting Things Done by David Allen - you might find it helpful and it is quite cheap. He has a website and there are loads of resources about his simple system on the internet. A lot of different types of people I've recommended it to have found it useful - some in terms of being able to evidence their overwork!

Please don't get yourself to the stage where you get ill over this.

Oh yes and one final thing... as a fellow perfectionist - you have to be happy with turning in work that's 'good enough' in times of extreme workload else you will go bonkers! Have you got a friend or ex-colleague that you could ask to help you identify what's 'good enough' in your context?

Wishing you all the very best :cross:
Like all the other advice this is excellent. I like the idea of "Getting Things Done by David Allen" and am going to look at it myself for Paul.

DD, I know you well enough by now in a cyber sort of way to know how difficult this situation must be for you.

Do not make yourself, at the least unhappy and at the most ill.

If your immediate superior is as nice as you say she will listen to you and try to ease the load for you if they do not want to lose you.

As much a you would like to be super human, I hate to break the news to you, but you are just human like the rest of us and have a breakng point. Do not allow yourself to get to it.

hugs xxx
 


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