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Tarrah a bit, bab and other local sayings

Lottie12

Silver Member
Just read a thread about initial speak. lol !!
It got me thinking about local words used by local people which sound perfectly natural because they are so commonplace but would make an "outsider" scratch her head. I'll start, but would love to hear yours.

Tarrah a bit = bye, see you later.(Birmingham)

I've just mashed= pot of tea ready to pour.
(Leicester)

Sloarming = Leaning/slouching on you in an irritating way (Nottingham)
 
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Auburn

x x x
It's like a whole different world here in Aberdeen for an English lass like me... this is what I've grabbed since moving here... at least I think I have :p

Ken - to know
Fit - what
Far - where
Ken fit like - you know how it is
Flycup - cup of tea. To be "away for your fly" is to take a tea break...
They use "away" instead of about, like "I'm away to phone Frank"...
A piece is a snack
A fine piece is a cake or traybake or something like that
Juice is fizzy pop, like coke. Well irn bru here :p

OH! And the one that bugs me so much... THAT ONES. Instead of "those ones" or "that one"... "can you pass that books?" Grrrr !!!
 

evilpenguin

Not evil at all
Some similar ones here in Edinburgh, Auburn. Never heard of the flycup one! The fit and far ones aren't used here at all.

Can't really think of any others. We say 'the night' and 'the day' instead of tonight/today if that counts lol.
 

MadameLaMinx

Gold Member
I'm half Scots and have much family in the Highlands, one of my favourite Scots expressions is "greeting" - which means crying or whining about something. As opposed to saying hello.
 

HelsAngel

Silver Member
We say "on the drag" a lot down here and I'm always pulled up on it.
"I'm on the drag".
People think it means a man dressed in ladies clothes, walking down the high street or having * week!! It only means running late.

We call prams and buggies, trippers or strollers and my favorite word that no one knows of is a billywitch. Some people call them cockchafers, may bugs, june bugs or july bugs but here in Suffolk, it's a billywitch or "that bloody thing that flies around conifers and gets stuck in your hair"!
 

Mrs.S.

Gold Member
Fab thread!

I'm a scouse lass, grew up in Leicester and now love in Yorkshire!

'me duck' is a Leicester thing I hate, I also dislike love which is a Yorkshire thing!

A buffet is apparently a stool round here!

An alleyway is a ginnel and a brook is a beck???


The one about mashing a cup of tea below - never heard of it until I came to Yorkshire!!

jilly said:
Just read a thread about initial speak. lol !!
It got me thinking about local words used by local people which sound perfectly natural because they are so commonplace but would make an "outsider" scratch her head. I'll start, but would love to hear yours.

Tarrah a bit = bye, see you later.(Birmingham)

I've just mashed= pot of tea ready to pour.
(Leicester)

Sloarming = Leaning/slouching on you in an irritating way (Nottingham)

Auburn said:
It's like a whole different world here in Aberdeen for an English lass like me... this is what I've grabbed since moving here... at least I think I have :p

Ken - to know
Fit - what
Far - where
Ken fit like - you know how it is
Flycup - cup of tea. To be "away for your fly" is to take a tea break...
They use "away" instead of about, like "I'm away to phone Frank"...
A piece is a snack
A fine piece is a cake or traybake or something like that
Juice is fizzy pop, like coke. Well irn bru here :p

OH! And the one that bugs me so much... THAT ONES. Instead of "those ones" or "that one"... "can you pass that books?" Grrrr !!!

This auburn is like another language!!
 

Shirleen

Gold Member
We don't have any down here, Although I did ask my mate why all her family have the same first initial. She looked a bit perplexed until I told her she was always saying "R Bob/R Lyn/R John"

We have Breakfast lunch and Dinner/Tea, in that order.

I do wonder 'Why is the living room called the 'front' room no matter where it is in the house?
 

Tinytootz

Mini crazy cat lady
No matter where you are going here, it is up - "up town", "up the hospital", "up me parents". And everyone gets called "duck", which I still can't hear myself ever saying. And its breakfast, dinner and tea, which throws me. And instead of replying "no thanks" to a question like "would you like a drink", it's "I'm good thanks", or "I'm alright", which my dad insists on picking me, and anyone else up on! And we make a brew, rather than a cuppa.

My Scottish nana used to say "ach, awae an raffle yasiel" (excuse the phonetics!) to my dad a lot when he was irritating her, and I still don't know what it meant! *google says "get knotted"*
I love the language from around there, neeps and tatties, having a piece and jam for your lunch, greetin', sausages being links or slices, being pelly wally, "dya think I'm buttoned up the back?" being the bairn even when I was 24. I still have family in John O'Groats, but for the life of me I can't remember any other phrases or words!
 
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dudette2001uk

I will be a Princess!
The one about mashing a cup of tea below - never heard of it until I came to Yorkshire!!


I can understand this one though as I'm supposing it stems from mashing the tea leaves? I could be wrong though!

Fab thread! :D

I'm from Wales, and most of our sayings are a bit odd! The one that often drives people insane is:

"I'll be there in a minute now" - meaning I'll be there soon, but makes very little sense at all!

"Where you to/where you at" are sayings that annoy me...why can't people just say where are you?!

I used to use "you're cooking my swede" quite often when I was telling someone they were doing my head in. Said it to one of the children in school the other day - they looked at me as if I'd grown two heads, lol! :8855:

I had a few friends from Swindon who used to pronounce bald as bold - why?!?!!? Lol! :)

Funny the colloquialisms that different areas have.
 

Auburn

x x x
I thought of another one... if I buy something new, for example, and I'm off to see the fella, he says "take it round " meaning "bring it with you"

Strange boy..
 

Pickle81

Full Member
Another Welshism is 'cwtch' (pronounced cutch - rhymes with butch). It means hug.. As in, 'can I have a cwtch?' but in some parts of Wales it's also used as the name for a cupboard under the stairs.
It's my favourite Welsh word :)
 

Princess_Stevie

Gold Member
When my best friend and I were on holiday, a lot of the people we met thought it was funny how we said 'lush', 'mint' or 'class' for things they would describe as 'good' - or 'sound', as the were Liverpudlian.

In Darlington, where I went to college, a lot of people say 'moying on' for what would be described as kissing, or as we say, 'necking on' with someone. I hate that saying, it makes me shudder at the thought of it.

'Lifting' is a word we tend to use a lot too, meaning awful or disgusting. A lot of people are baffled when they hear this lol.

Isn't it funny how we all have our little sayings :) xx
 

HelsAngel

Silver Member
I love the way that there are so many different names for exactly the same thing.

Being a southerner, we have bread rolls and baps. I've looked at someone strangely before for calling it a bread cake or a batch and I still laugh at barm yet when I say a bap, it's totally unnatural to my northern friends. My Geordie friend taunts me about not knowing what Parkin is and I'd never heard of cinder toffee until Bonfire Night because it's always just been called honeycomb!
 

Princess_Stevie

Gold Member
I love the way that there are so many different names for exactly the same thing.

Being a southerner, we have bread rolls and baps. I've looked at someone strangely before for calling it a bread cake or a batch and I still laugh at barm yet when I say a bap, it's totally unnatural to my northern friends. My Geordie friend taunts me about not knowing what Parkin is and I'd never heard of cinder toffee until Bonfire Night because it's always just been called honeycomb!

Yeah, I work part time in a bakers and when someone came in and asked for a breadcake I just stared at them blankly lol. I get annoyed when I don't know what people mean lol, they're not breadcakes, barms, baps or rolls..it's a friggin breadbun!! Lol.
 

Tinytootz

Mini crazy cat lady
We have the bread debate in our house a lot, and there's only two of us!

"Can you get me a crusty cob?"
"A crusty what?!?!"

He insists on saying cob, and I say roll or bap. To me a bun is a cake, like a little muffin.
 

LornaGrace

Full Member
I have always used the word 'mardy' and on holiday people were always confused as to what i meant, now i suppose Arctic Monkeys have made it more common?
Does anyone use it?
 




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