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fund raising ideas for £1500

S: 16st8.0lb C: 14st4lb G: 12st0lb Loss: 2st4lb(13.79%)
#2
I've done a few bake sales and they've been quite successful. They do require a lot of planning but the last one I did we managed to raise £400 in 2 days. Making gingerbread men for kids to decorate was a good one. You can charge a wee bit extra for that and they cost pennies to make.

Otherwise maybe sell some stuff on eBay?
 

missgalaxy

Yummy Mummy! xx
S: 248lb C: 248lb BMI: 40 Loss: 0lb(0%)
#3
What about a charity evening including an auction?

You can auction things like car washing for a year, cutting the grass for a year, become a waiter/waitress for a night etc etc.

x
 
#5
Get your company to sponsor you. London Marathon is big enough that if you wear a t-shirt with their logo on it they will get pretty good exposure. Depending on how generous his organisation is they might give a flat donation or offer to match the money.

What exactly does 'phab' kids do? Presumably not spelling bees.
 
#6
It's a charity that promotes integration of Physically Handicapped and Able Bodied children- the words I have capitalised as you can see spell out PHAB.

DD- I'm confused- does he have to agree to raise £1500 in order to secure a spot to run in the marathon? In which case you probably need to be making up sponsor forms, contacting local press etc - Do PHAB not have guidelines for how this money can be raised, or template software for sponsor forms, publicity advice etc? I'm assuming that's what you mean because it's not clear from the OP whether they want him to pay £1500 in order to be able to run on their behalf - which makes no sense, or if he has to prove he can raise that much in order to be able to use one of their charity places in the race.

Either way, impressive stuff and best of luck to him!!
 
#7
I think youre right MLM that they want him to agree to raise the amount in order to get a place. I thought when it came to these things you had to agree to raise the amount, which is why most people set up a justgiving page for donations. Ive never heard of anyone having to pay the money up front to enter.

It might be worth double checking exactly what they mean.
 
S: 107kg C: 85kg G: 79kg BMI: 33.2 Loss: 22kg(20.56%)
#8
I did a sponsored slim which worked well and raised loads of money for our local children's home. We have done a mini garden fete with tombola, white elephant stall, second hand book stall, did cream teas, we had an M&S in those days and they sponsored all the clotted cream ( worth contacting them for help). We have done auctions but auctioned donated items as well as services, baby sitting etc. That is an easy one and raises loads of money.

Sponsored swims, walks,karaoke, a race night, ( horse racing on film ) a sports day in the local park with fun events like the 3 legged race, sack race, egg and spoon, wheelbarrow race etc ( participants pay to enter and a *bookie *on the field takes bets ).

Quite recently we did a dog show for an organisation called HELP all the classes were fun classes, dog with longest tail etc. Every class was sponsored and the participants paid to enter. We served soft drinks and hot dogs and had a home produce stall. That was a good money spinner.

Good luck !!!
 
#9
With regards to running VLM for charity places, the way most of them operate is you have to have the minimum sponsorship by the required date (which is usually a week or two after the marathon to allow post run donations). From the people I've seen who have been forced to pay out of their own money, I would imagine you are contractually bound. So it is much easier to raise most of it pre-run and just get a few extra bits of sponsorship for the run after it.
 
#10
I can see that charities would want to make sure that they benefitted from people running "in their name" but it seems so uncharitable to make people pay out of their own funds if they cannot raise the specified amount!! £1500 is a LOT of money by most peoples standards, and they are getting some level of free advertising out of it.

Charities are great but are so strictly regulated these days to ensure that they maximise the money they get in and how they use it - and I understand WHY they have to be that way but it just kind of takes the emphasis away from the charitable aspect of what they do.
 
#11
I can see that charities would want to make sure that they benefitted from people running "in their name" but it seems so uncharitable to make people pay out of their own funds if they cannot raise the specified amount!! £1500 is a LOT of money by most peoples standards, and they are getting some level of free advertising out of it.

Charities are great but are so strictly regulated these days to ensure that they maximise the money they get in and how they use it - and I understand WHY they have to be that way but it just kind of takes the emphasis away from the charitable aspect of what they do.
Indeed. I (and a lot of running friends) get so frustrated. No other hobby has this problem of having to fork out huge amounts of money for charities for events. People tire easily (and it isn't fair to keep asking) of giving you money for events, especially when they know you want to do it for yourself not charity anyway.

What is cheekier too is when you see adverts such as
"Got your own marathon ballot place? Congratulations! If you pledge to raise at least £300 you can run for xxx charity"

Uh.. if I have my own marathon place I will raise money out of my own free will and you can accept whatever I give you!
 


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