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Sweetners.........confused

#2
Hi Maisy I use Splenda all the time now.. I have tried them all but splenda came tops for me. I use the granulated and the tablet. Hope this helps.
 

Indieflower

I have my mojo
#6
I like to make sure I get a sweetener that doesn't contain Aspartame....a nasty little chemical! I know that Splenda definitely doesn't have it :)

K xx
 
#7
Does anyone use that silverspoon one? Was gonna get some today, 75p from tesco! But changed my mind cos not sure how it tastes lol. I get that sweet N low one from asda at the minute its only £1!
 
#8
I like to make sure I get a sweetener that doesn't contain Aspartame....a nasty little chemical! I know that Splenda definitely doesn't have it :)

K xx
What is aspartame? Oh no mine has this in!! :eek: I thought mine was called sweet n low but just checked and its actually called simply sweet.
 

Indieflower

I have my mojo
#9
Apologies for the long post, but this is what I found to sum it up best. I avoid this like the plague! You will find it in alot of Sugar free squash as well.

Aspartame changes the ratio of amino acids in the blood, blocking or lowering the levels of serotonin, tyrosine, dopamine, norepinephrine, and adrenaline. Therefore, it is typical that aspartame symptoms cannot be detected in lab tests and on x-rays. Textbook disorders and diseases may actually be a toxic load as a result of aspartame poisoning.

Aspartame accounts for over 75 percent of the adverse reactions to food additives reported to the FDA. Many of these reactions are very serious including seizures and death.(1) A few of the 90 different documented symptoms listed in the report as being caused by aspartame include: Headaches/migraines, dizziness, seizures, nausea, numbness, muscle spasms, weight gain, rashes, depression, fatigue, irritability, tachycardia, insomnia, vision problems, hearing loss, heart palpitations, breathing difficulties, anxiety attacks, slurred speech, loss of taste, tinnitus, vertigo, memory loss, and joint pain.

Side effects can occur gradually, can be immediate, or can be acute reactions

According to Lendon Smith, M.D. there is an enormous population suffering from side effects associated with aspartame. Then, there are users who don’t ‘appear’ to suffer immediate reactions at all. Even these individuals are susceptible to the long-term damage caused by excitatory amino acids, phenylalanine, methanol, and DKP.
Adverse reactions and side effects of aspartame include:
Eye
blindness in one or both eyes
decreased vision and/or other eye problems such as: blurring, bright flashes, squiggly lines, tunnel vision, decreased night vision
pain in one or both eyes
decreased tears
trouble with contact lenses
bulging eyes
Ear
tinnitus - ringing or buzzing sound
severe intolerance of noise
marked hearing impairment
Neurologic
epileptic seizures
headaches, migraines and (some severe)
dizziness, unsteadiness, both
confusion, memory loss, both
severe drowsiness and sleepiness
paresthesia or numbness of the limbs
severe slurring of speech
severe hyperactivity and restless legs
atypical facial pain
severe tremors
Psychological/Psychiatric
severe depression
irritability
aggression
anxiety
personality changes
insomnia
phobias
Chest
palpitations, tachycardia
shortness of breath
recent high blood pressure
Gastrointestinal
nausea
diarrhea, sometimes with blood in stools
abdominal pain
pain when swallowing
Skin and Allergies
itching without a rash
lip and mouth reactions
hives
aggravated respiratory allergies such as asthma
Endocrine and Metabolic
loss of control of diabetes
menstrual changes
marked thinning or loss of hair
marked weight loss
gradual weight gain
aggravated low blood sugar (hypoglycemia)
severe PMS
Other
frequency of voiding and burning during urination
excessive thirst, fluid retention, leg swelling, and bloating
increased susceptibility to infection
Additional Symptoms of Aspartame Toxicity include the most critical symptoms of all
death
irreversible brain damage
birth defects, including mental retardation
peptic ulcers
aspartame addiction and increased craving for sweets
hyperactivity in children
severe depression
aggressive behavior
suicidal tendencies
Aspartame may trigger, mimic, or cause the following illnesses:
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
Epstein-Barr
Post-Polio Syndrome
Lyme Disease
Grave’s Disease
Meniere’s Disease
Alzheimer’s Disease
ALS
Epilepsy
Multiple Sclerosis (MS)
EMS
Hypothyroidism
Mercury sensitivity from Amalgam fillings
Fibromyalgia
Lupus
non-Hodgkins
Lymphoma
Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD)



Aspartame poisoning is commonly misdiagnosed because aspartame symptoms mock textbook ‘disease’ symptoms, such as Grave’s Disease.
 
#10
Sticking up for science

Kerry is right that there is a lot of controversy about the sweetener Aspartame, but please don't be overly alarmed. If you choose to avoid it, that's entirely up to you and you won't be doing yourself any harm, but if you do have small amounts every day/week/month/year, you're highly likely to be fine as well.

An aside, but possibly interesting for anyone vaguely interested in science and how it affects us - diets are heavily spoken about in connection with science. If you're busy, skip over this! Please note I'm not disagreeing with Kerry or want to start a debate on Aspartame, but science is misunderstood and as the general public, you're entitled to understand it better!
To give you some background to science (and its misunderstandings) - anyone can call themselves a scientist and anyone can publish results of experiments or research carried out. In fact, right now I'm publishing this. I'll tell you that three of my t-shirts got hit by bird poo on the washing line today while they were drying. What does this mean for the danger of washing getting hit by bird poo you may ask? Answer - no-one knows - I haven't told you enough about my 'study' on bird-poo, t-shirts and washing lines, and nor has my methods of studying said washing events been independently evaluated by a leading expert in the field. For research to be credible, it must have been published in an open, peer-reviewed journal with full details of the study, which in turn, must be relevant to the statements we use to summarise and apply the results of such research.

Secondly, side effects/symptoms. If I got 100 of you to take part in an approved clinical trial I have now, following all the restrictions above (do the experiments properly and fairly, get them published, etc etc) and 80 of you lost weight, 6 had a runny nose (it is pollen time after all), twenty of you felt bloated (green days anyone?), one had diarrhoea (dodgy curry?), and one was sick in the mornings (pitter patter of tiny feet?), I would still have to publish all of these things as confirmed side effects of the drug I was testing. Whether you would have had these symptoms anyway, I can't say, but I must say that because, when you were taking the drug, you experienced these things, they may have something to do with the drug.

Now look at the list of things aspartame might be causing. Is it aspartame, or is it not?

Food for thought?
 
#11
Entirely true Paperclip, and definitely food for thought! But for me, I choose not to take the risk. Without doubt no one should be overly alarmed, in moderation I should imagine effects would not be felt.

The way I like to look at these things are, many years ago it was thought that Tobacco could do us no harm!! A scientfic stance is always subject to change :):)

K xx
 
#12
I avoid aspartame too! When I was in the states I was alarmed to see Aspartame had to be labeled on every food product, some even looked like the warnings you see on cigarette packets but it isn't labeled on anything over here, only if you study the ingredients! Worrying! Anywho, so cos of this i use Splenda.
 
#13
Aspartame is usually labelled differently over here - you'll normally see the mention of 'contains a source of phenylalanine' - check a can of diet coke next time and you'll see it. In the USA, they say what that source usually is (Aspartame - this breaks down in the body to give the natural amino acid phenyalanine).

There's a few unfortunately folk who can't have phenylalanine in their diet, so anything that contains it, or a source of it, must be very clearly labelled.
 


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