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Swine Flu Jab - HELP!!

LovelyLauren

My husband = My hero
#1
Ladies,

first of all sorry not been around much, get married 2 weeks today and trying to sort my house in London so u can imagine...


Havce been keeping up to date with you all though...

I have had an appointment for my Swine Fu jab - it is on Tuesday.

Saw that Shell has decided against it adn am completely in 2 minds my self...

Im peftrified of taking it incase it affects the baby in anyway, but also petrified i will get it and could loose the baby etc...

What are you all doing?? what is the general concensus??


I need help making the decision!!!

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
 
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shelbell

Trainee Human On Board
#2

fatfighter

wannabe yummy mummy
#3
I second Shell. I'm a nurse and a fair few of my (none pregnant) colleagues have turned it down because of unknown risks. Of course there are risks with all medical interventions but TBH even if I wasn't expecting I wouldn't be having it. At the end of the day though it's a very personal choice and only you can decide what's right for you and your baba. Good luck whatever you decide to do :)
 
#4
I think you would be better taking it. They do put these drugs through rigorous testing.

H1N1 is a real danger to pregnant women.

The only reason I wouldn't be taking the vaccine is because I don't think I need it and i wouldn't want someone wasting a shot on me.

You're probably better asking your doctors advice about it.

Although if I understand correctly all vaccines do is introduce a very weak strain of an infection to your blood stream. Which means that your white cells can form a defence so if you are exposed to the full strength version they have no problems in fighting it off. So I can't see how there would be any unknown risks anyway
 
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shelbell

Trainee Human On Board
#5
The unknown risks are there because the vaccine hasn't been tested on pregnant women, and hasn't been used long enough to know any long term effects. Also, they contain mercury which is toxic and an adjuvant which hasn't been thoroughly researched.

The testing done to license this vaccine was only done on a small number of people, less than 500, and was very recent so only looks at short term side effects. Hardly rigorous testing.
 

LovelyLauren

My husband = My hero
#6
Thanks guys,

Shell im going to spend a good while reading through that info, and really weigh up the pro's and cons, wish i was still little enough for my mum to decide, not nice having to decide for your own little one...

Interested to know if any of our pregnant ladies have had it, or turned it down though..

thanks again xx
 
#7
The unknown risks are there because the vaccine hasn't been tested on pregnant women, and hasn't been used long enough to know any long term effects. Also, they contain mercury which is toxic and an adjuvant which hasn't been thoroughly researched.

The testing done to license this vaccine was only done on a small number of people, less than 500, and was very recent so only looks at short term side effects. Hardly rigorous testing.
Swine flu - Vaccine

Safety issues

The government takes decisions about introducing a new vaccine very seriously. Vaccines would not be licensed if they were considered unsafe.
Similar flu vaccines containing a different flu virus strain (H5N1) have been clinically tested and the trials showed that these vaccines are safe and produce enough antibodies to provide protection.
Experience with seasonal flu vaccines has shown that changing the strain of virus in a vaccine does not substantially affect the safety profile of the vaccines.
But, as with any new vaccine, some very rare side effects cannot be identified or excluded until the swine flu vaccines are used in much larger numbers of people in the general population.
Outcomes of trials to date suggest that pandemic vaccines are as safe as seasonal flu vaccines.
If nothing else the law suits the government and the paramacuetical companies would face would be just ridiculous.
 

XxAbbiexX23

Dieting & Mummy To Ethan
#8
Well I have to say that I don't think I'll be getting the Swine Flu jab. If I wasn't pregnant, then maybe I would, but I'm not wanting to get the jab and then get sick from it. I'm too scared of it affecting the baby.
 
#9
To be fair it's unlikely that I'll even be offered the jab at all. I'm not pregnant, I don't have any underlying health conditions and although my dad has been offered it his isn't serious enough to warrant other family members getting it.

I'm just not in the anti-vaccine brigade because I don't personally think that the government or the health service would offer something if they knew there was a likelihood it could cause permanent damage and not inform people of it.

It is entirely up to you what you want to do. I just have a bad habit of playing devils advocate :eek:
 

Sunflowers

Wants to be a yummy mummy
#10
Purple - the who originally advised pg women NOT to have the main vaccine being given out and to have the non-adjuvent version. This, however has since been retracted - coinciding with the decision that the non-adjuvent version will only be available to true egg allergy patients and, therefore, a limited number will be made of the non-adjuvent vaccine will only be made proportional to the amount of people who willneed it. I will therefore be staying away from the vaccine. I had flu when pg with jocelyn (genuine, a temp of 39.5+ for 4 days despite paracetamol etc) and no one gave a monkeys - just said keep taking paracetamol and fluids.
 
#11
Purple - the who originally advised pg women NOT to have the main vaccine being given out and to have the non-adjuvent version. This, however has since been retracted - coinciding with the decision that the non-adjuvent version will only be available to true egg allergy patients and, therefore, a limited number will be made of the non-adjuvent vaccine will only be made proportional to the amount of people who willneed it. I will therefore be staying away from the vaccine. I had flu when pg with jocelyn (genuine, a temp of 39.5+ for 4 days despite paracetamol etc) and no one gave a monkeys - just said keep taking paracetamol and fluids.
As I said it's entirely up to you whether you take it or not but I was under the impression that H1N1 was more serious for pregnant women than normal flu?
 

LovelyLauren

My husband = My hero
#13
Well after long deliberation I decided against it, i then got sent home from work with a temperature and feeling like iv been hit by a bus, been on the couch all afternoon alseep, talk about bloody karma haha

hoping i will feel better tomorrow, informed my midwife who wants me to ring her in the morning,

absolutely not thinkin its the swine flu, but just my luck to get sick haha

xx
 

mummy2beslim

taking one day at a time
#15
hi everyone .I had my swine flu jab today and after searching long and hard and talking to lots off health proffesionals and looking at data think I made the right decision .swine flu is at my sons nursery and a few pupils and teachers have been off i just cannt risk getting it and been really ill or worse .the swine flu jab has not been tested on pregnant women but as it says here
have the vaccines been trialled on pregnant women?
No. This has been seized upon by some to question their safety, and has spurred controversy. However, no vaccines are routinely tested on pregnant women. Vaccines are given to pregnant women when it is clinically necessary — such as polio, tetanus and seasonal flu vaccines. The safety of giving a particular vaccine is instead assessed from what is already known about its ingredients and the results of toxicity studies. Some non-pregnant women enrolled in trials do fall pregnant shortly after — these cases are followed up, with all information added to the assessment of possible risks. Any medication given to pregnant women is subject to extremely careful consideration on both clinical and ethical levels. The decision is made on a balance of benefit and risk. The Department of Health states that it has "no reason to believe there is a risk of harm from giving the swine flu vaccines in pregnancy".
another bit off info that may help
Your concern about your unborn baby is understandable, but the fl u shot will not harm the baby. In fact,
it protects your baby by protecting you. Pregnant women are at high risk for serious illness and death
from any infl uenza virus, but especially the H1N1 virus. That’s why the Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention urges pregnant women (and many other groups of people) to get both the H1N1 and seasonal
fl u vaccines.
If you get the fl u, you have a higher-than-average risk of developing pneumonia, which lowers the amount
the oxygen in your blood. This means your fetus many not receive enough oxygen for normal development.
In addition, having the fl u during pregnancy increases your risk of a miscarriage or giving birth too
early. And women who have a fever early in their pregnancy are more likely to deliver a baby with a neural
tube defect, such as spina bifi da.
You can pass the protective antibodies you develop after receiving the vaccine to your fetus. That will help
protect your baby from the fl u after it’s born.
Some parents worry that thimerosal, a mercury-based substance in many vaccines that keeps them from
becoming contaminated with bacteria or other germs, might cause a development disorder called autism.
But the theory that thimerosal can cause autism has been studied thoroughly, and there is no credible
evidence of a link between them. Parents who remain concerned about thimerosal should opt for the
nasal spray vaccine, which does not contain the substance.
Even if you can’t remember the last time you had a cold, much less the fl u, you should still consider getting
the vaccines. Your ability to mount an effective immune response to viruses may have worked well in
the past, but that provides no guarantee of future health. And even though the H1N1 virus so far hasn’t
been more dangerous, on average, than seasonal fl u, it does seem to be more severe in children, healthy
young adults and people under age 50, including pregnant women. (People over age 50 seem to have some
immunity against H1N1, thanks to a related fl u virus that “made the rounds” decades ago.)​

 

mummy2beslim

taking one day at a time
#16
hi everyone .I had my swine flu jab today and after searching long and hard and talking to lots off health proffesionals and looking at data think I made the right decision .swine flu is at my sons nursery and a few pupils and teachers have been off i just cannt risk getting it and been really ill or worse .the swine flu jab has not been tested on pregnant women but as it says here
have the vaccines been trialled on pregnant women?
No. This has been seized upon by some to question their safety, and has spurred controversy. However, no vaccines are routinely tested on pregnant women. Vaccines are given to pregnant women when it is clinically necessary — such as polio, tetanus and seasonal flu vaccines. The safety of giving a particular vaccine is instead assessed from what is already known about its ingredients and the results of toxicity studies. Some non-pregnant women enrolled in trials do fall pregnant shortly after — these cases are followed up, with all information added to the assessment of possible risks. Any medication given to pregnant women is subject to extremely careful consideration on both clinical and ethical levels. The decision is made on a balance of benefit and risk. The Department of Health states that it has "no reason to believe there is a risk of harm from giving the swine flu vaccines in pregnancy".
another bit off info that may help
Your concern about your unborn baby is understandable, but the fl u shot will not harm the baby. In fact,
it protects your baby by protecting you. Pregnant women are at high risk for serious illness and death
from any infl uenza virus, but especially the H1N1 virus. That’s why the Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention urges pregnant women (and many other groups of people) to get both the H1N1 and seasonal
fl u vaccines.
If you get the fl u, you have a higher-than-average risk of developing pneumonia, which lowers the amount
the oxygen in your blood. This means your fetus many not receive enough oxygen for normal development.
In addition, having the fl u during pregnancy increases your risk of a miscarriage or giving birth too
early. And women who have a fever early in their pregnancy are more likely to deliver a baby with a neural
tube defect, such as spina bifi da.
You can pass the protective antibodies you develop after receiving the vaccine to your fetus. That will help
protect your baby from the fl u after it’s born.
Some parents worry that thimerosal, a mercury-based substance in many vaccines that keeps them from
becoming contaminated with bacteria or other germs, might cause a development disorder called autism.
But the theory that thimerosal can cause autism has been studied thoroughly, and there is no credible
evidence of a link between them. Parents who remain concerned about thimerosal should opt for the
nasal spray vaccine, which does not contain the substance.
Even if you can’t remember the last time you had a cold, much less the fl u, you should still consider getting
the vaccines. Your ability to mount an effective immune response to viruses may have worked well in
the past, but that provides no guarantee of future health. And even though the H1N1 virus so far hasn’t
been more dangerous, on average, than seasonal fl u, it does seem to be more severe in children, healthy
young adults and people under age 50, including pregnant women. (People over age 50 seem to have some
immunity against H1N1, thanks to a related fl u virus that “made the rounds” decades ago.)



I have had sore arm all and aching legs all day seems to be easing though thank goodness apart from that feel fine
 

mummy2beslim

taking one day at a time
#19
nealry ready now just need to collect rest off the things form mum's house :D
I asked about my son having ait and they said he was not priority so cant have it dont know why ,are you not having it then shel ,how old is your son and have you decided against it :wave_cry:
 

shelbell

Trainee Human On Board
#20
No, I'm not having it. I'm high risk for swine flu cos of my other health problems, I have a wacky immune system, so anyone who lives with me is entitled to have it. My son's 8 so I'm happy for him to have it, and hubby is a field engineer so comes into contact with a lot of people every day so he's decided to have it too.
 


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