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Water????????????????????????????

satty

Full Member
#1
OK so have just come across this story on the bbc news, thoughts please?:sign0163:

BBC NEWS | Health | The dangers of too much detox

A woman was left disabled after following a "detox" diet which involved drinking large quantities of water.
Although doctors stress the need to avoid dehydration by drinking enough fluids, drinking more than enough is a different matter.
The human body may be mostly water, but you can have too much of a good thing.
In the most serious cases, "water intoxication" can kill, and there is, say experts, scant evidence that drinking even slightly more water than usual can improve your health.
The current popularity of detox diets which recommend drinking many litres of water a day, and drinking even when not thirsty, could cause problems if taken to extremes, they say.
The claim is that drinking more than usual can do everything from improving your skin tone to "flushing out" toxins from your body.

You shouldn't be drinking massively over and above what you feel with comfortable with



Ursula Arens
British Dietetic Association

However, the amount of water actually needed in a day varies from person to person, and depends on other factors such as climate, and exercise, says the British Dietetic Association.
Flawed industry
Ursula Arens, a dietician, said that there was a difference between normal consumption of one or two litres a day, not just in the form of water, but also from coffee, tea, and juice, and constant, ritualistic consumption of water throughout the day.
"You shouldn't be drinking massively over and above what you feel with comfortable with, when you're not thirsty, in a mechanical way."
She said that the evidence supporting the whole "hydration industry" was flawed.
"If you're a top sportsman, earning £10,000 for a single game, I can understand the need to focus intensely on your hydration, but not if you're someone just doing a couple of lengths at the swimming pool.
"It's just a great marketing opportunity, nothing more."
She said that the science of detoxing was unsupported by evidence, partly because its precise effects on the body had never been defined.
She added: "The body already has perfectly good ways of getting rid of toxins - mainly in the liver, and it's hard to see how consuming more water would affect these."
'No evidence'
Others are more scathing about the fashion for both detoxing and taking frequent sips from an ever-present bottle of mineral water.
Kidney specialist Professor Graham MacGregor said there was no evidence that either had any benefit.

People should drink when their body tells them to - when they get thirsty



Prof Graham MacGregor
St George's University of London

He described how too much water could "overwhelm" the body's natural mechanisms for keeping levels in balance.
"The body already has a brilliant system for doing this, but if water levels in the blood rise too high, it just can't cope."
If vast quantities of water are taken, salt in the blood gets too dilute, he explained. When the salt solution in the blood is weaker than the solution in the cells and organs it supplies, water passes into those cells and organs.
In extreme cases, this causes organs such as the brain to swell up, and can stop it working properly, putting the drinker in serious danger.
Professor MacGregor said: "This isn't just a problem with water - we used to see patients who had been diagnosed with 'water intoxication' after drinking 20 pints of beer."
"In normal circumstances, then people should drink when their body tells them to - when they get thirsty.
"Anything else is completely unnecessary, and will just leave you standing in the queue for the toilet.
"Detox diets are a complete con in that respect."
 
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Bea

Back on the wagon!
S: 17st7lb C: 16st5lb G: 11st0lb BMI: 39.3 Loss: 1st2lb(6.53%)
#2
Wonder how much water was she drinking???
 

Bea

Back on the wagon!
S: 17st7lb C: 16st5lb G: 11st0lb BMI: 39.3 Loss: 1st2lb(6.53%)
#4
Obviously not......Satty. I saw the news reports...apparently she was on the "amazing hydration diet" that included reducing salt and significantly increasing water intake...but it didnt say how much water?
 

Madferret

Mad as a Hatter
S: 12st10lb C: 12st10lb G: 10st0lb BMI: 27.9 Loss: 0st0lb(0%)
#5
I've not heard much about this... just the headlines on the radio yesterday. There was a big mention about her reducing her salt intake, which can make you ill, but wasn't too sure about how much water she was having.
I have heard that you can overdose on water though, so maybe there is something in it, but I would have thought it would have to be v v large amounts..
 

slimming-girl

Silver Member
S: 16st1lb C: 15st5lb G: 10st7lb BMI: 33.7 Loss: 0st10lb(4.44%)
#6
Water intoxication (also known as hyperhydration or water poisoning) is a potentially fatal disturbance in brain functions that results when the normal balance of electrolytes in the body is pushed outside of safe limits by over-consumption of water.[1] Normal, healthy (both physically and nutritionally) individuals have little to worry about accidentally consuming too much water. Nearly all deaths related to water intoxication in normal individuals have resulted either from water drinking contests, in which individuals attempt to consume more than 3 gallons (10 litres) of water over the course of just a few minutes, or long bouts of intensive exercise during which electrolytes are not properly replenished, yet massive amounts of fluid are still consumed. you would have side effects of over intoxification..... ie nausea, vomiting headaches altered mental state... im a nurse i drink loads of water 2-3 litres at work on a good day... whats happened here is the news as over interprited to put the frights on people you are fine :D :p
 

harriet2

serial poster
G: 68kg
#8
there was a woman on here back in january who'd actually had to be taken into hospital because she'd overdosed on water and was very ill (it overloads the cells).

she was advised to never drink more than 6lts a day

h xx
 

Vickie_L

Silver Member
#10
there was a woman on here back in january who'd actually had to be taken into hospital because she'd overdosed on water and was very ill (it overloads the cells).

she was advised to never drink more than 6lts a day

h xx

no harm of me doing that! lol i haven't even got through one litre yet today!
 
S: 11st4lb G: 8st4lb
#11
I cant imagine ever drinking more than 5 litres - I have drank 4 litres some days - but i reckon 3 litres is an average day for me.....
 

Medea

Is Irrepressible!! : )
#12
I saw this article yesterday as well......

I think it basically puts into terms that we must sip the water over the course of the day rather than drink shed loads in one go cos we forgot!

I can quite easily drink 4-5 litres a day because my mouth feels dry all the freakin' time, although I managed to get hold of those Listerine pocketpaks from ebay which do help. I think I timed it at 1 litre every 2 hrs whilst at work and I'd defo get my 4 in, so thats what I stick to.

Remember: just keep sipping, sipping, sipping xx
 

trimlee

Love God; Love People
S: 13st0lb C: 11st13lb G: 11st0lb BMI: 27 Loss: 1st1lb(8.24%)
#13
There is a medical basis for the news. it is not scaremongering. Pls do not exceed the recommended amount of water per day. Water intoxication and hyponatremia are real medical conditions that can arise from excessive water intake. (personally I'm not in danger of exceeding 3L per day!)
 

Bea

Back on the wagon!
S: 17st7lb C: 16st5lb G: 11st0lb BMI: 39.3 Loss: 1st2lb(6.53%)
#15
Thanks Mini (just posting as you did) the advice when I previously asked on LT has been no more than 4ltrs..... (thats why I asked how much was this woman taking)
 

Mini

Administrator
Staff member
S: 18st2lb C: 16st3.5lb G: 11st2lb Loss: 1st12.5lb(10.43%)
#16
I sent an email to Lipotrim and this is what I recieved back in January.

Be careful. There is some dangerous nonsense in the chat rooms. Usually 3 litres is fine, but not more than 4
----- Original Message -----​
From: Mini Mins
Sent: Sunday, January 27, 2008 11:50 AM​
Subject: Question How Much Water?​
I have a question concerning how much water is recommended while on the Lipotrim Pharmacy Programme.
The minimum is 4 pints (2.5 litres) and how much more water would it be safe to take on top of this.
Thanking you
 
S: 18st9lb G: 9st0lb
#17
Thanks for that Mini, you have put my mind at ease.

x
 

philip

Full Member
S: 16st12lb C: 16st12lb G: 13st7lb BMI: 32.9 Loss: 0st0lb(0%)
#18
im sick of this water talk..i really think people should be careful what they write and say...


ive been watching t.v there, and on richard and judy show there 5 mins ago a Dr was on..
Read the link below
Channel 4 - News - Water drinking benefits 'dubious'
 

Shazpaz

Regular Member
#19
im sick of this water talk..i really think people should be careful what this write and say...


ive been watching t.v there, and on richard and judy show there 5 mins ago a Dr was on..
Read the link below
Channel 4 - News - Water drinking benefits 'dubious'
Interesting...but you cannot escape the fact that if you drink more water you lose more weight. This has been proved time and time again on LT and CD. I used to aim for 4 litres. The danger is if you drink too much in one go. I used to sip a pint at a time.
 

philip

Full Member
S: 16st12lb C: 16st12lb G: 13st7lb BMI: 32.9 Loss: 0st0lb(0%)
#20
hi shazpaz, i know what you saying..but everyone is different and alot of people like myself are new to this and look around this site for good safe advice.... i was reading some-where that a guy was drinking 6-7 litres a day...maybe good enough for him but for somone else, this amount could really end up bad..

Maybe im being abit funny on this subject, but all i want is to be safe and shed the bubber in a healthy wasy
 


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